By Kristen Fritz

 

stop textingWe've all seen the 'Stop Texting' magnets stuck to the back of vehicles, and it puts things into perspective when you look at the statistics. In 2011, 3,331 people were killed in crashes involving distracted drivers; in 2010, it was 3,267, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

 

It has become more common than ever to see drivers texting while driving. But it's no longer just teens; adults play a huge role as well. According to a new survey done by AT&T, 49 percent of adults surveyed said they text and drive even though 98 percent of adult drivers surveyd said they know that distracted driving isn't safe. But the popular trend is on the uprise as six out of 10 drivers said they never texted behind the wheel just three years ago, said AT&T.

 

While the survey showed adults were more likely to engage in the bad habit, 43 percent of teens also said they were sending messages while behind the wheel. One of the most common reasons why teens text and drive is rather simple: most text-message users, the survey said, expect a reply within five minutes or less.

 

AT&T found that not having a parental rule against texting and driving is among the greatest predictors that a teen will send messages while driving. Other factors included whether a teen had a full- or part-time job, owned a smartphone or usually sent more than 100 text messages per day.

 

Find more information on distracted drivers or request a "Stop Texting" magnet from Lehigh Valley Health Network.